DNS Leak

If you are testing for DNS leaks on sites like dnsleaktest.com, ipleak.net or dnsleak.com and it shows you that there is a DNS leak (especially on the last one), it usually does not actually mean that there is a DNS leak. If the DNS server IP is in the same country as the location you're connected to, but the IP itself is not equal to the IP that you're actually assigned, that's not an issue.

When you connect to a Windscribe location, you get a random IP address, however the DNS server for each location runs on the same IP, so they usually will not match. All DNS queries are made over the tunnel, which eliminates the chance of an IP leak entirely, since you won't be able to resolve DNS if there is an issue with the tunnel. You can verify this by running the nslookup command in your Terminal / command line.

C:\Users\test>nslookup windscribe.com
Server: UnKnown
Address: 10.111.134.1
Non-authoritative answer:
Name: windscribe.com
Addresses: 104.20.75.194
104.20.74.194

"Address: 10.111.134.1" = IP of the DNS server. All Windscribe DNS servers will start with 10.11x. Since this is an internal IP address, you won't be able to resolve DNS queries if you're not connected to Windscribe.